Follow @sanbasansousi Instagram the universal empire: ayiti toma
the universal empire: ayiti toma
-roots: africa
-culture: caribbean
-history: 1804
-religion: gihnen

July 24 2014, 09:28 AM

134 notes   •  VIA: newagerasta   •   SOURCE: pan-afrikan-education
Filed Under:  ayititomafood  azaka  akayi  
papaseanproductions:

pan-afrikan-education:

SIX BLACK SUPERFOODS The darker the food, the more powerful it is in nutrients. 1. Black rice Brown rice is good for you, but black rice is even better. That’s because the bran hull contains significantly higher amounts of vitamin E, which bolsters the immune system and protects cells from free radical damage. In fact, black rice contains more anthocyanin antioxidants than blueberries, according to a study from the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center. 2. Black lentils These legumes are loaded with iron: One cup has about 8 milligrams, getting you almost halfway to the daily requirement of 18 milligrams for women. Lentils also boast high levels of soluble fiber, which may not only lower your cholesterol, but could also improve immune function, according to a new University of Illinois study. 3. Blackberries Polyphenols found in dark berries may help reduce cognitive decline in older age by cleaning up cells that impair brain function, researchers at the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging in Boston say. Blackberries are also hugely fiber-rich—one cup has almost 8 of the 25 grams you need daily. 4. Black beans The dark skins of these beans are packed with bioflavonoids—potent plant-based nutrients that may protect against cancer, research out of Cornell University reveals. 5. Black soybeans Move over, edamame. A Korean study found that eating black soybeans can help reduce the risk of thrombosis—a type of blood clot that’s potentially fatal—even more than yellow or green soybeans. And all soybean oil contains alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid that may reduce the risk of heart disease. 6. Black tea Green and white teas get all the health hype, but good old black tea has its perks, too. It contains Theaflavins—antioxidants that a study from Rutgers University in New Jersey suggests may improve recovery from muscle soreness after intense exercise. Drinking black tea may also lower your risk of having a heart attack.
Personally I would pass on the soy…

Black rice is good but I still haven’t mastered the soaking process. That phytic acid is no bueno

I have to try black  rice with djondjon (Ayitian black mushroom)…double melanin on my plate.

papaseanproductions:

pan-afrikan-education:

SIX BLACK SUPERFOODS

The darker the food, the more powerful it is in nutrients.

1. Black rice
Brown rice is good for you, but black rice is even better. That’s because the bran hull contains significantly higher amounts of vitamin E, which bolsters the immune system and protects cells from free radical damage. In fact, black rice contains more anthocyanin antioxidants than blueberries, according to a study from the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center.

2. Black lentils
These legumes are loaded with iron: One cup has about 8 milligrams, getting you almost halfway to the daily requirement of 18 milligrams for women. Lentils also boast high levels of soluble fiber, which may not only lower your cholesterol, but could also improve immune function, according to a new University of Illinois study.

3. Blackberries
Polyphenols found in dark berries may help reduce cognitive decline in older age by cleaning up cells that impair brain function, researchers at the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging in Boston say.

Blackberries are also hugely fiber-rich—one cup has almost 8 of the 25 grams you need daily.

4. Black beans
The dark skins of these beans are packed with bioflavonoids—potent plant-based nutrients that may protect against cancer, research out of Cornell University reveals.

5. Black soybeans
Move over, edamame. A Korean study found that eating black soybeans can help reduce the risk of thrombosis—a type of blood clot that’s potentially fatal—even more than yellow or green soybeans.

And all soybean oil contains alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid that may reduce the risk of heart disease.

6. Black tea
Green and white teas get all the health hype, but good old black tea has its perks, too. It contains Theaflavins—antioxidants that a study from Rutgers University in New Jersey suggests may improve recovery from muscle soreness after intense exercise. Drinking black tea may also lower your risk of having a heart attack.

Personally I would pass on the soy…

Black rice is good but I still haven’t mastered the soaking process. That phytic acid is no bueno

I have to try black  rice with djondjon (Ayitian black mushroom)…double melanin on my plate.

July 24 2014, 09:09 AM

67 notes   •  VIA: paintitout   •   SOURCE: artdream
Filed Under:  ayititomacivilisation  

artdream:

Haiti: The art of the masquerade.

July 22 2014, 07:55 PM

1 note  Filed Under:  ayititomalanguage  samba  poetry  belpawol  

M’ te twò pre, m’ pat’ sa wè bote w’…

 -

Zazou (x)

Transalation: I was too close, I couldn’t how beautiful you are…

July 22 2014, 08:05 AM

49 notes   •  VIA: haitianhistory   •   SOURCE: haitianhistory
Filed Under:  men koze a  ayititomahistory  
haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - July 22, 1795 - Treaty of Basel signed between France and Spain. 
While this second Treaty of Basel guaranteed the end of hostilities between the French Convention and the Spanish Crown, for both countries’ overseas colonies, the Treaty had larger implications as Spain ceded its share of Hispaniola (modern day Dominican Republic) to France.
In January 1801, assuming that Santo Domingo was now part of the French Empire (although never completely integrated to the latter), Toussaint Louverture pressured the local Spanish administration to give it up fully to his (and thus French) authority. Still in 1801 (July), Louverture proceeded in creating a Constitution for the entire island of Hispaniola in which he abolished slavery on both sides of the island and imposed new laws. Louverture’s gesture did come to cause much animosity between Dominicans and Haitians in later years. 
Map: Courtesy of The Louverture Project.

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - July 22, 1795 - Treaty of Basel signed between France and Spain. 

While this second Treaty of Basel guaranteed the end of hostilities between the French Convention and the Spanish Crown, for both countries’ overseas colonies, the Treaty had larger implications as Spain ceded its share of Hispaniola (modern day Dominican Republic) to France.

In January 1801, assuming that Santo Domingo was now part of the French Empire (although never completely integrated to the latter), Toussaint Louverture pressured the local Spanish administration to give it up fully to his (and thus French) authority. Still in 1801 (July), Louverture proceeded in creating a Constitution for the entire island of Hispaniola in which he abolished slavery on both sides of the island and imposed new laws. Louverture’s gesture did come to cause much animosity between Dominicans and Haitians in later years. 

Map: Courtesy of The Louverture Project.

July 22 2014, 07:20 AM

fyblackwomenart:

MARIE LAVEAU by KsPeR

fyblackwomenart:

MARIE LAVEAU by KsPeR

July 22 2014, 07:16 AM

3 notes   •  VIA: kreolmagazine   •   SOURCE: o0midnightsky0o
Filed Under:  ayititomafood  akayi  azaka  
o0midnightsky0o:

Papaya Tree, French Guyana

Pye-papay

o0midnightsky0o:

Papaya Tree, French Guyana

Pye-papay

July 18 2014, 07:51 PM

17 notes   •  VIA: blacksupervillain   •   SOURCE: brownjesus
Filed Under:  ayititomaspirituality  
brownjesus:

All y’all into Haitian history or history or religion or just reading need to cop right now.

Si n’ vle konnen nan zafè listwa, espirityalite oswa nè vle li kouri al’ achte liv sa’ kouhn’ya

brownjesus:

All y’all into Haitian history or history or religion or just reading need to cop right now.

Si n’ vle konnen nan zafè listwa, espirityalite oswa nè vle li kouri al’ achte liv sa’ kouhn’ya

July 17 2014, 08:45 PM

haitianhistory:

African American artist Richmond Barthé with bust of Haitian revolutionary leader Toussaint Louverture. In 1947, Dumarsais Estimé, then President of Haiti, recruited Barthé to build sculptures of both Toussaint Louverture and Jean-Jacques Dessalines as public monuments.
Image and source courtesy of: Krista A. Thompson (2007)

haitianhistory:

African American artist Richmond Barthé with bust of Haitian revolutionary leader Toussaint Louverture. In 1947, Dumarsais Estimé, then President of Haiti, recruited Barthé to build sculptures of both Toussaint Louverture and Jean-Jacques Dessalines as public monuments.

Image and source courtesy of: Krista A. Thompson (2007)

July 17 2014, 12:48 PM

1 note  Filed Under:  try it  ayititomaspirituality  zing  

What Vodou Lwa Are you 

I am Lasirenn, Lwa of the Sea: Peace, love, and happiness, you great big hippie. You are a daydreamer, with a watery spirit. You love the outdoors and are an avid environmentalist. Most of the time, you are calm and laid back, always going with the flow, but if you see something wrong in the world, you will not stand by and let it happen without voicing your opinion. The world is too great to let someone ruin it!

July 17 2014, 09:21 AM

6 notes  Filed Under:  ayititomaspirituality  

Taking a page out of the Gospel of Pat Robertson, Chibly Langlois, Haiti’s first Roman Catholic cardinal revealed the “big social problem” in Haiti: Vodou. He argued that Vodou offers “magic” but no real solutions to a population deprived of justice and a political voice.
“If a person is well educated and has the financial means, they will go to a doctor [instead of the Vodou priest] when they get sick. If that same person went to the court to get justice they would not go to the Vodou priest to get revenge. It’s a big problem for the church. And for Haiti,” Langlois said.
This uncritical scapegoating of the Vodou religion (called Santeria in Cuba and Candomblé in Brazil) as the source of Haiti’s problems is typical amongst Catholics and their evangelical Christian counterparts. It implies that Christianity provides you not only with enlightenment from your backwards ways, but financial gains…I guess Italy and Greece just haven’t been praying hard enough!
In my travels around Haiti, I have come across many villages where there is no police presence and nor is there a clinic nearby for basic care, often leaving the Vodou priest or priestess( hougans and manbos) to serve every role from midwife to judge and jury. Yet Langlois and the Catholic Church he represents remain silent on the deeply imbedded inequality in Haiti and a Haitian government more interested in attracting foreign tourists by any means than providing basic social services to its people. He also fails to critique the international community who have little to show for $9 billion funneled through international contractors and NGOs in Haiti with little accountability since the 2010 earthquake.
Contrary to the Cardinal’s statement, Vodou is not Haiti’s problem; Christianity is. No push to spread Vodou ever wiped out entire “savage” indigenous peoples. Vodou has caused no wars due to a desire to convert as many people as possible. Vodou doesn’t tell “saved souls” that they must be complacent, accepting their lot on Earth for the potential of future salvation in heaven. Vodou never told Black people they were a curse or 3/5ths of a person.
Vodou is of the belief system that sustained our ancestors across the Middle Passage, during the brutality of the plantation, and through the victories of slave rebellions. Haiti should never apologize for it.
Christianity and the West’s real problem with Vodou is that, like the Maroons who practiced it, it remains elusive to those who would aim to profit off of it, package it, and control it. Unlike Hinduism or Buddhism, Westerners can’t take a “spiritual journey” to Haiti to “find themselves” in a Vodou temple. Vodou remains a religion steeped in African traditions, for people of African descent, and based on an understanding of the linkages between the natural and spiritual world—-Hollywood can’t make a Julia Roberts movie out of that.
When it comes to the poor and most vulnerable, the Catholic Church with its $10- $15 billion in wealth looks less like the teachings of Christ and more like a big corporation. For centuries the Church has been complacent in, and at times profited from, slavery, the Holocaust, selling babies, and, most recently, the sexual abuse of children. I have encountered many wealthy preachers and priests, but I have yet to meet a rich hougan.
Haiti and all the worlds’ poor need a Cardinal that can speak up for “real solutions to a population deprived of justice and a political voice” such as a judicial system free from corruption and accessible to all its people, access to quality healthcare for all regardless of income, free and compulsory primary education, and jobs that pay a living wage. Or even a Cardinal who can simply stand up to a UN who refuses to acknowledge its responsibility for a cholera epidemic that’s killed 9,000+ Haitians. A Church that remains silent on all these issues is a problem.
Unfortunately, it’s far easier for Langlois to shame the poor and Vodouists rather than risk his position in the gilded halls of the Vatican by taking a stand for social justice. As Gandhi once lamented, “You Christians are so unlike your Christ.”


Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/news-views/haiti-doesnt-have-a-vodou-problem-043#ixzz37jPvEAnC
Follow us: @EbonyMag on Twitter | EbonyMag on Facebook

 - ebony: Haiti Doesn’t Have A Vodou Problem, It Has a Christianity Problem

July 17 2014, 09:08 AM

Ti chen gen’ fos devan kay mét li.

 -

Haitian Saying: “A little dog is really brave in front of his master’s house.” Refers to people who are cowards when alone, but become brave when they have people they can count on to do most of their fighting for them.

Black Proverbs: Diaspora Edition

(via blackproverbs)

July 17 2014, 08:59 AM

678 notes   •  VIA: randomactsofquirkiness   •   SOURCE: artdream
Filed Under:  melanine  

artdream:

2014 Miss Haiti Contestants

http://instagram.com/misshaitiofficial

July 16 2014, 10:09 PM

10 notes  Filed Under:  ayititomatourism  
Okap, Ayiti
via Cooperative Azaka (Facebook)

Okap, Ayiti

via Cooperative Azaka (Facebook)

July 16 2014, 09:59 PM

37 notes   •  VIA: newagerasta   •   SOURCE: artdream
Filed Under:  ayititomacivilisation  

artdream:

Haitian Folkloric Dance, Haiti c.1954

Dans Folklorik Ayisyen, Ayiti v. 1954

July 16 2014, 08:52 PM

artdream:

Carnival Queens, Haiti  February 7, 1960

Renn  Kanaval, Ayiti
7 Fevriye, 1960

artdream:

Carnival Queens, Haiti
February 7, 1960

Renn  Kanaval, Ayiti

7 Fevriye, 1960